Photographer Bio Examples to Upgrade Your “About” Page

Are you looking for photographer bio examples and ideas for your “About” page? Then, you are in for a treat because in this article, we will be helping you create an amazing bio.

One of the hardest things to do is selling yourself. Writing about yourself feels awkward and sometimes really cringey. The problem lies in balancing modesty while also presenting your competency and talent. And because of this, some, if not most, freelancers are really having a difficult time writing about themselves.

While showcasing your works through portfolios and online pages is perhaps easier in marketing your service, clients will still look for your personal and professional profile. Of course, they want to know who they will be working with. So, it is still advisable and very much recommended that you include information about yourself on your website, social media pages, and other platforms.

Perks of A Bio

You might think that as a photographer, clients will only be interested in looking at your work. After all, your photographs may seem like the best (and only) way to represent your talent and skills. But you see, with photography being a project that involves close interaction, clients will want to get to know you. There needs to be a face behind the name. Some clients will find it more endearing if they get to know your story or experiences. It adds a personal touch to your business.

You’d be surprised, but sometimes, it is what’s written in the bio that makes a client choose which photographer to hire. Remember, you are competing with thousands of freelance photographers (U.S. statistics for freelance Photographers). And while clients may not easily distinguish the differences between your works with others, your bio can be the key to getting the gig.

computer showing photos and a bio on a table with other things

What’s in a Bio?

If you check on other photographer bio examples, you will notice that there are different ways to present yourself. Some have lengthy bios that tell their life stories, while others have short, bulleted bios. So what should you put in your bio?

The Photo

Ah, here’s another hard decision to make. There are so many options on which photo to place in your bio.

  • The Portrait. The most often used photo is that of your own headshot. It is simple and gives the client a glimpse of who they will be working with. A good portrait to use is one where you are looking straight at the camera. It would have a feeling that you are looking and communicating directly with your client. It’s like you are already having a connection with them.
  • Candid Shot. You may want to present yourself as a fun and easy-to-work-with photographer. So, you can use a candid photo of yourself. Or maybe, you can edit your portrait and add some filters, elements, and designs to make it more creative. This works well if you are offering post-processing services as well. This way, clients will have an idea of how artistic you are.
  • Action Shot. You can also opt to choose a photo showing you at work. A photo showing you on the job means you are serious about your craft. If you have your own studio, this is a good way to showcase it too.

Your Intro

Your introduction is the obvious and smart way to begin your bio. Just think of this as how you would introduce yourself to a client personally. “Hi. I am Carl, and I am a Travel Photographer.” Simple, right? It is best that you use the name you prefer your client to call you. By doing so, you are already building a friendly relationship.

In your introduction, you should already establish what type of photographer you are. You can also include your general address (city, state, or province), so clients will know if it is feasible to hire you—location-wise. Your intro should not be lengthy to give more space for your story.

Your Story

You may write about why you chose photography as your profession. Or, establish your competency by writing about your experiences and credentials. It would be nice if you had any awards or citations to mention.

You may also include some other personal details about yourself, like hobbies or other interesting talents. This will soften your bio and help make the tone more friendly. Clients will want to work with photographers who they know they can easily talk and discuss ideas with.

Pro tip: Be careful about typos, spelling and grammatical errors, and cultural nuances. If you really feel uneasy, you can write your bio in the third person point of view (imagine a friend introducing you to the client).

Photographer Bio Examples

Here are some photographer bio examples to give you inspiration and ideas in creating your own. But remember, your bio should reflect your personality, so there are really no rules to follow except to keep it professional.

Short But Sweet

It is definitely okay if you wish to have a simple and short bio. To make this work for you, remember to highlight the important stuff, like the type of photography you do, your location, personal achievements, and other noteworthy information. Remember, your bio should speak to your potential client. Your bio will help them decide if they will consider hiring you.

If you are just starting and have few experiences to note, you can be creative in writing your bio. You can focus on why you love photography. You can also give an insight into your feelings toward the type of photography you chose. For example, you can say that growing up in a big family made you want to be a family portrait photographer.

Here are some simple short photographer bio examples:

close up of woman wearing glasses and black shirt

TAMIA BAKER

Tamia | Portrait Photographer

Austin, Texas

  • XYZ School of Photography graduate
  • 4 years experience as a freelance professional photographer
  • Photo Contributor at ABC Publishing
  • 2021 ACME Best Portrait Photographer
  • 2020 ACME Most Promising Photographer Award

I’m a full-time freelance photographer who loves lattes and corgis.

Hi! I’m Carl.

My name’s Carl, and I am a wedding photographer in New York. I have been doing wedding photography for over three years now.

I’ve covered many weddings in NYC, and still think weddings are absolutely magical.

man on a suit holding a camera with lights on background

Long and Engaging

Having a lengthy bio is not a bad idea. After all, if you will be publishing your bio on your website, it is good that you establish your personality and your business on it. It gives you a sense of real ownership of the site. Also, this is your chance to really let your potential clients know you more.

Here are some samples of a lengthy bio:

photographer sitting on rocks taking photo of a river

Ryan.

Ryan is a professional photographer who grew up in Vancouver, Canada. As a child, Ryan loved spending his days outdoors, playing and exploring. On rainy days, he would draw pictures of mountains and rivers. During his teen years, he discovered photography. He immediately fell in love with nature photography, and now, it is his passion.

Ryan loves adventure. He likes capturing images that would make his audience want to discover more about nature. He travels around the world with his favorite camera and brings home memories immortalized in his amazing photographs.

This young photographer has contributed photos in major magazines and online sites. He was awarded “Best Nature Photographer” by ACME in 2020 and 2021. Ryan teaches photography to young teens when he is not traveling. He believes that alongside teaching the art of photography, his students will also develop a deeper love and respect for nature.

creative monotone photo of a woman with colorful sparkles

Hi! I am Aaliyah.

Over the last fifteen years of my career, I earned a sense of creativity. I want to show the beauty of life in a chaotic world.

In my first year as a photographer, I thought the photos I took needed more spark. So I enrolled in a graphic design class. I combined my photographs with visual arts and finally saw what I was looking for. The spark!

Check out my portfolio and see how I transform normal photos into enchanting ones!

Bio for Social Media

Most photographers take advantage of social media platforms. For one, it is easier to upload photos and images. Also, your photos on social media will absolutely get more views. Instagram, for one, is a photographer’s haven. With millions of users, your photo will definitely reach a wider audience. This means you’ll have more chances to get leads or potential customers.

Writing a bio for your social media pages is trickier. Unlike your website, social media platforms have limited space for you to tell your story. So, how do you write a good bio on these platforms?

  • Be Concise. There’s no need (and space) for lengthy sentences. Make sort but impactful sentences.
  • Use Your Adjectives. It is also acceptable to simply use words that describe you. It doesn’t necessarily need to be a sentence, for instance: “Events Photographer” or “Passion for Art.”
  • Location is a Must. Because social media is a global platform, you must indicate your location.
  • Add Your Links. Add your website and other social media links. This way, potential clients can have more ways to look into your projects.
  • Emojis. Yes, use your emojis and icons. This will give space for more characters.

Your Time to Shine

Your bio is basically your opportunity to shine and stand out. Remember, potential clients will read your bio even before calling you to inquire. So, your bio is like a quick pitch to the gig. It is an introduction to who they will be working with.

Do not be overwhelmed and panic in writing your bio. Be yourself and just write about yourself. Plus, you can always check out photographer bio examples for inspiration.

Get Organized & Win More Clients

Kosmo has everything you need to run your freelancing business.

Post written by:

Kosmo is a free All-In-One Workspace for Freelancers.